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Nov 17
Category: Imerman Angels
Tags: , , , ,
Written By: Imerman Angels @ 11:23 am


(Love the Movember ‘stach JI)

Nov 9

Just when you thought there was a Groupon for everything, the popular company has stepped up to provide the opportunity to donate to Imerman Angels.   Each Groupon sells for $5.  If 200 people make a contribution, we will have the funds to take our contact management database to the next level!

http://www.groupon.com/deals/imerman-angels

As always, donations to IA help us to push our mission to the next level, reaching out to as many cancer fighters and survivors that we can to pair them in 1-on-1 relationships.  Please stop by Groupon and show love for the Angels!

(Thank you, Groupon, for supporting our cause.)

Nov 6

Young Adult Cancer fighters and survivors may enjoy a new journal affiliated with our friends at the CHOC Children’s Hospital. The journal is targeted to young adults with cancer and it’s awesome

Check it out!

About the Journal
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO) will have a very broad mandate. Dedicated to the promotion of interdisciplinary research, education, communication, and collaboration between health professionals in AYA oncology (aged 15-39 at diagnosis), JAYAO
will provide a forum for AYA cancer research and practice advances to all professional participants and researchers in AYA cancer care. Our multidisciplinary editorial board and readership will include but will not be limited to: pediatric, medical, and surgical oncologists of all types and specialties; oncology nurses and advanced practice staff; psychosocial and supportive care providers including psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers; translational cancer researchers; and academic and community-based pediatric and adult cancer institutions.

JAYAO’s content includes:
* Original peer-reviewed articles
* Provocative roundtable discussions
* Review articles, Editorials, and Perspectives
* Advocacy group spotlights
* Highlights of clinical trials relevant to AYAs
* Case studies with AYA-impact enhancement
* Pharmacology highlights
* News bites

Nov 2

The Mo, slang for moustache, and November come together each year for Movember.

Movember challenges men to change their appearance and the face of men’s health by growing a moustache. The rules are simple, start Movember 1st  clean-shaven and then grow a moustache for the entire month.  The moustache becomes the ribbon for men’s health, the means by which awareness and funds are raised for cancers that affect men.  Much like the commitment to run or walk for charity, the men of Movember commit to growing a moustache for 30 days.

The idea for Movember was sparked in 2003 over a few beers in Melbourne, Australia.  The plan was simple – to bring the moustache back as a bit of a joke and do something for men’s health. No money was raised in 2003, but the guys behind the Mo realized the potential a moustache had in generating conversations about men’s health.  Inspired by the women around them and all they had done for breast cancer, the Mo Bros set themselves on a course to create a global men’s health movement.

In 2004 the campaign evolved and focused on raising awareness and funds for the number one cancer affecting men – prostate cancer. 432 Mo Bros joined the movement that year, raising $55,000 for the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia – representing the single largest donation they had ever received.

The Movember moustache has continued to grow year after year, expanding to the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Ireland, Spain, South Africa, the Netherlands and Finland.

In 2009, global participation of Mo Bros and Mo Sistas climbed to 255,755, with over one million donors raising $42 Million US equivalent dollars for Movember’s global beneficiary partners.

Oct 26

In this photo: Jonny Imerman

…. Research on the link between relationships and physical health has established that people with rich personal networks — who are married, have close family and friends, are active in social and religious groups — recover more quickly from disease and live longer. But now the emerging field of social neuroscience, the study of how people’s brains entrain as they interact, adds a missing piece to that data.

The most significant finding was the discovery of “mirror neurons,” a widely dispersed class of brain cells that operate like neural WiFi. Mirror neurons track the emotional flow, movement and even intentions of the person we are with, and replicate this sensed state in our own brain by stirring in our brain the same areas active in the other person.

Mirror neurons offer a neural mechanism that explains emotional contagion, the tendency of one person to catch the feelings of another, particularly if strongly expressed. This brain-to-brain link may also account for feelings of rapport, which research finds depend in part on extremely rapid synchronization of people’s posture, vocal pacing and movements as they interact. In short, these brain cells seem to allow the interpersonal orchestration of shifts in physiology.

Such coordination of emotions, cardiovascular reactions or brain states between two people has been studied in mothers with their infants, marital partners arguing and even among people in meetings. Reviewing decades of such data, Lisa M. Diamond and Lisa G. Aspinwall, psychologists at the University of Utah, offer the infelicitous term “a mutually regulating psychobiological unit” to describe the merging of two discrete physiologies into a connected circuit. To the degree that this occurs, Dr. Diamond and Dr. Aspinwall argue, emotional closeness allows the biology of one person to influence that of the other.

John T. Cacioppo, director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago, makes a parallel proposal: the emotional status of our main relationships has a significant impact on our overall pattern of cardiovascular and neuroendocrine activity. This radically expands the scope of biology and neuroscience from focusing on a single body or brain to looking at the interplay between two at a time. In short, my hostility bumps up your blood pressure, your nurturing love lowers mine. Potentially, we are each other’s biological enemies or allies.

READ MORE!

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