Subscribe Print
  • Send/Share
 photo gallery  youtube  Facebook  Twitter  Myspace  LinkedIn  act of good    
Nov 8

Dave Hardin, IA volunteer, supporting MOVEMBER with his stache (nice, man!) with Dr. Oz!

Nov 3

IA friend and VP of the I’m Too Young for This Cancer Foundation, Jack Bouffard, reps IA to the maxx on Halloween, dressing up as our founder at the 2nd Annual Stupid Cancer Halloween Scaretacular Costume Ball in NYC. Well played, Jack!

Nov 2

The Mo, slang for moustache, and November come together each year for Movember.

Movember challenges men to change their appearance and the face of men’s health by growing a moustache. The rules are simple, start Movember 1st  clean-shaven and then grow a moustache for the entire month.  The moustache becomes the ribbon for men’s health, the means by which awareness and funds are raised for cancers that affect men.  Much like the commitment to run or walk for charity, the men of Movember commit to growing a moustache for 30 days.

The idea for Movember was sparked in 2003 over a few beers in Melbourne, Australia.  The plan was simple – to bring the moustache back as a bit of a joke and do something for men’s health. No money was raised in 2003, but the guys behind the Mo realized the potential a moustache had in generating conversations about men’s health.  Inspired by the women around them and all they had done for breast cancer, the Mo Bros set themselves on a course to create a global men’s health movement.

In 2004 the campaign evolved and focused on raising awareness and funds for the number one cancer affecting men – prostate cancer. 432 Mo Bros joined the movement that year, raising $55,000 for the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia – representing the single largest donation they had ever received.

The Movember moustache has continued to grow year after year, expanding to the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Ireland, Spain, South Africa, the Netherlands and Finland.

In 2009, global participation of Mo Bros and Mo Sistas climbed to 255,755, with over one million donors raising $42 Million US equivalent dollars for Movember’s global beneficiary partners.

Aug 16

I don’t know about you, but I felt like all of the crazy, zaney, hilarious misadventures of my life came to a screeching STOP! when I was diagnosed with cancer. Rather than waking up after a night of hard partying to find a cold, half-eaten slice of pizza in my purse (true story), I was spending my days engaged in deep soul-searching sessions and hour-long conversations about the meaning of life with everyone from my doctor to my cousin to the person in the stall next to me in the ladies’ room. At night, I logged some serious hours researching doctors, hospitals, and my type of cancer. I listened to endless hours of Musak while hold with the insurance company, took lots of naps, and just generally worried about the future. Clearly, this was not how I envisioned life at 26.

 

Looking back on it, there were entire months after my diagnosis where I didn’t laugh once. Not once! (Ok, so maybe I chuckled at some lame joke while watching Everybody Loves Raymond in the hospital waiting room, but that was more of a pity laugh than a true guffaw).

 

Of course, cancer takes a while to process—and rightfully so. But the one thing I needed most after all that processing was something to distract me from cancer and allow me to be a goofy twenty-something again. I’ve noticed that I, as well as most of my peers, deal with the ups and downs of life by enlisting a little humor or sarcasm. It doesn’t mean that we’re the jaded, misguided, “me” generation that the media claims we are – it’s just our way of coping.

 

Surely, I thought, my fellow young adult cancer survivors would be out there laughing in cancer’s face, right? (After all, we can’t expect grandpa to be crackin’ jokes about how testicular cancer has turned him into the Uni-Baller, or a five year-old to come up with a more original line than, “Orange you glad I didn’t say banana?”). As it turns out, I couldn’t have been more wrong! Of the many cancer websites, discussion boards, and books I’d read, only one tried to incorporate humor. Other websites on laugh therapy seemed like they were written by our parents, or copied out of those joke books you buy at the check-out line of grocery stores.

 

So, I started collecting some funny tidbits here and there. I want to share those with you now, in the hopes that someone out there will see them and break that awkward, depressing waiting room silence with a good chuckle, or at least find some pleasant distraction from the heaviness of it all–even if it’s just for a few minutes. After all, if cancer has taught me anything, it’s that every minute counts. So why not spend ‘em laughing?

 

Below are some links to what I found. If you have any others, please share them, too.

Fainting Goats

The Half-Million Dollar Shot

Emoticon War: SuperNews!

Gladys on the Ellen Show

Awkward Family Photos: Curly

Awkward Family Photos: Anything for the Shot

Dramatic Chipmunk

Baby Beyonce

Contributed by, survivor, Amanda Pope.

Jul 8
Category: Imerman Angels
Tags: , , , , , ,
Written By: Imerman Angels @ 3:48 pm

imermanGQ asked you to nominate a man who strives every day for the betterment of society through charitable work, volunteerism, and community involvement. You answered the call with truly inspiring stories.”

Our own Jonny was nominated in the GQ Better Men Better World Search.  If you’ve met JI, you would know that there is no other guy like him: he genuinely cares about every individual that he meets and dedicates his life towards building a community that ensures that no one in the world will fight cancer alone.  Traveling all over the country to speak to schools, hospitals, advocacy groups and fighter/survivors, he is tireless in his efforts.

Whether or not you win, Jonny, you are the Better Man to us!

Check out this link to learn more.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »